Course: Learn Laser Interferometry


2.Plane Waves > 2. Michelson Interferometer

1.Arm Length Difference

Author: Daniel Töyrä

1. Introduction

The aim of this session is to build a model of a Michelson interferometer, and investigate how its output depends on the macrospical lengths and microscopical tunings of its arms. The Michelson interferometer is the core of the interferometric GW detectors such as LIGO, Virgo, GEO and KAGRA.

Recommended notebooks before you start:

We recommend that you have looked through introductory notebooks that you find in the folder 01_Introduction before you start this one, or that you have basic experience of IPython/Jupyter Notebooks, PyKat, and Finesse. The link above only works if you started IPython/Jupyter Notebook in the top directory of this course.

Reading material and references:

[1] A. Freise, K. Strain, D. Brown, and C. Bond, "Interferometer Techniques for Gravitational-Wave Detection", Living Reviews in Relativity 13, 1 (2010). - Living review article (more like a book) on laser interferometry in the frequency domain for detecting gravitational waves, and FINESSE.

[2] A. Freise, D. Brown, and C. Bond, "Finesse, Frequency domain INterferomEter Simulation SoftwarE". - FINESSE-manual

[3] FINESSE syntax reference - Useful online syntax reference for FINESSE. Also available in the Finesse manual [2], but this online version is updated more often.

After this session you will be able to:

  • build a FINESSE-model of a Michelson interferometer.
  • calibrate the operating point of the FINESSE-model.

2. Modelling a Michelson Interferometer using FINESSE

We start by loading PyKat and other Python packages that we need:

In [ ]:
import numpy as np                         # Importing numpy
import matplotlib                          # For plotting
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt                   
from pykat import finesse                  # Importing the pykat.finesse package
from pykat.commands import *               # Importing all packages in pykat.commands.
from IPython.display import display, HTML  # Allows us to display HTML.

# Telling the notebook to make plots inline.
%matplotlib inline      
# Initialises the PyKat plotting tool. Change the dpi-value to 
# make plots appear smaller/bigger on your screen.
pykat.init_pykat_plotting(dpi=90)          

Lengths and tunings in FINESSE

If the beams interfere constructively or destructively at the beam splitter depends on the difference in optical path lengths for the two arms, modulo the laser wavelength. Thus, for the light of a Nd:YAG laser ($\lambda = 1064$ nm), length differences of less than 1 μm are of interest. Some orders of magnitude:

  • LIGO peak senitivity in meters: $\sim 10^{-20}$ m
  • LIGO cavity mirror postion control accuracy: $< 10^{-12}$ m
  • LIGO arm cavity length: $\sim 10^3$ m
  • relative numerical accuracy of floating point numbers: $10^{-15}$

Because of the large differences in order of magntiude, it is convenient to split distances D between optical components into two parameters: one is the macroscopic ‘length’ L defined now as that multiple of the default wavelength $\lambda_0$ yielding the smallest difference to D. The second parameter is the microscopic tuning that is defined as the remaining difference between L and D. This tuning is usually given as a phase "phi" (in radians) with 2π referring to one wavelength. In FINESSE tunings are entered and printed in degrees, so that a tuning of phi = 360 degrees refers to a change in the position of the component by one wavelength ($\lambda_0$). In FINESSE macroscopical lengths are assigned to space components (keyword s) and microscopiacal tunings are assigned to optical components such as mirrors, beam splitters, lenes etc. You can read more about how lengths and tuning are defined in FINESSE in section 2.5 in Freise et al. [1].

2.1. Optical Layout and FINESSE model

Below is the optical layout of a simple Michelson. The laser beam is splitted by the beam splitter (BS) and propagates in both X and Y arms. Gravitational wave detectors are calibrated such that when the two beams are recombined at the beam splitter, they interfere (close to) destructively at the output port (a.k.a. south port, assymetric port, dark port), and they intefere constructively at the west port (a.k.a. symmetric port, bright port). Mirror movements or gravitational waves change the differential arm lenghth $\Delta L = L_y - L_x$, which produces a signal at the output port where we place a photodiode. See section 5.2 in the review article if you want a longer description of the Michelson interferometer.

Lets build an optical model in FINESSE matching the setup in the figure above.

In [27]:
basekat = finesse.kat()    # Initialising Finesse
basekat.verbose = False    # Tells Finesse to talk less

basecode = """
## Parameters ##
const Pin 1M         # Laser power (1 MW)
const LX 4000        # Length of X arm (4000 m)
const LY 4000        # Length of Y arm (4000 m)

## Laser & Beam splitter ##
l laser $Pin 0 n0                         # Laser
s s1 1 n0 nbsc                            # Space from laser to beam splitter
bs BS 0.5 0.5 0 45 nbsc nbsY nbsX nbsd    # Beam splitter (R = T = 0.5, phi = 0 deg, 
                                          # AoI = 45 deg).
## X arm ##
s LX $LX nbsX nmX1         # Space, BS to mX (4000 m)
m mX 1 0 0 nmX1 nmX2       # Mirror mX (R = 1, T = 0, phi = 0 deg)

## Y arm ##
s LY $LY nbsY nmY1         # Space, BS to mY (4000 m)
m mY 1 0 0 nmY1 nmY2       # Mirror mY (R = 1, T = 0, phi = 0 deg)

## Output port ##
s sout 1 nbsd nout         # Space, BS to output
"""

basekat.parseCommands(basecode)  # Parsing FINESSE code

We call this kat-object basekat since it describes the core optics of the system we will investigate throughout this notebook. The above basekat-object will not be altered much throughout the Notebooks about the Michelson interferometer, however, what we measure and the specific simulation instructions will. Therefore we can copy the above basekat object by using deepcopy, and then add on the specific simulation instructions.

2.2. Simulation example: Differential arm length tuning

Now we add the simulation instructions. Here we will look at how the output power varies with differential arm length (DARM) tuning.

In [24]:
kat1 = deepcopy(basekat)
code = """

## Detectors ##
pd pout nout      # Photo diode measuring DC-power

## Simulation instructions ##
# Varying the differential arm length
xaxis mX phi lin -90 90 200      # Sweeps phi of mX from -90 to 90 in 200 linear steps 

put* mY phi $mx1                 # Takes the negative (m in $mx1 is keyword for minus) 
                                 # value from the xaxis and puts it in phi of mY.
yaxis abs                        # Returns magnitude of detector outputs
"""
# Parsing the FINESSE code
kat1.parseCommands(code)
# Running the simulation
out1 = kat1.run()

The line put* mY phi $mx1 might be new to you, here follows a short explanation:

Parameters fronted by an $ are internal variables in Finesse, so here $mx1 refers to the current value of the xaxis times (-1). Without the m in front of x1 there would be no factor of (-1). The put command sets the position parameter phi of mirror mY to this value. Therefore, by using the put command here, we elongate one arm while shortening the other. The star (*) after put adds tells FINESSE to add the value instead of instead of overwriting it, which would be the case without the star. In this case it doesn't matter which we use though, but we use the star here for convenience later.

Simulation output:

The result of the run is now stored in the object out1. We can plot the output by using:

In [25]:
fig1 = out1.plot(xlabel="DARM / 2 [deg]", 
                 ylabel="Power [W]", 
                 title="Output power vs. Arm length difference")

3. Tasks:

3.1. Calibrate the operating point to the dark fringe

For the current setup we have a power peak when not changing anything, i.e., at zero on the x-axis in the figure above. But gravitational wave detectors operate close to the dark fringe, that is where the power is zero. Change one parameter in the setup to make the setup initially yield zero output power.

Answer:

In [ ]:
 

3.2. Detune the operating point

Your setup now yields 0 power if nothing is changed, however, the current gravitational wave detectors don't operate exactly at the dark fringe, but slightly off it. The reason for this lays outside the scope of this notebook: we need a local oscillator that beats with the signal sidebands, created in the the arms by gravitational waves, to see the the signal sidebands. Don't worry if you don't understand the former sentence.

Change the tuning slightly of one of the arm mirrors so that we get 10 mW as output. What length offset does this tuning offset corresponds to? Why not a larger number than 10 mW?

Comment: In case you want to use a `scipy.optimize` tool (I would suggest minimize_scalar()), FINESSE need can be told to compute results for one data point per run by using the command noxaxis in the FINESSE-code, or by making use of PyKat by typing kat.noxaxis=True..

Answer:

In [ ]:
 

3.3. Macroscopic arm length difference

Investigate the response of the Michelson interferometer to a change in the macroscopic arm length difference, i.e., change the lengths of the space components. What do you see and why?

Answer:

In [ ]:
 

3.4. Macroscopic arm length difference and change in frequency

In FINESSE the frequency of a laser field can be specified in two different ways:

  • One can set the absolute frequency of the carrier laser field by specifying the carrier wavelength. This can be done either by changing the parameter lambda in the kat.ini file located in your FINESSE directory, or by using the finesse code line 'lambda 1550n', or in PyKat by using kat.lambda0 = 1550.0e-9. In the last 2 examples we used 1550 nm as the new wavelength.

  • One can specify a frequency offset relative to the carrier by setting the frequency offset parameter f of the laser component.

Your task it to change both the absolute frequency and the relative frequency, but in separate runs, and see how these parameters changes the result of task 3.3. What do you see, and why?

Hint: Remember that FINESSE defines macroscopic lengths as integer multiples of the carrier wavelength.

Answer:

In [ ]:
 

4. Tasks with answers:

4.1. Calibrate the operating point to the dark fringe

For the current setup we have a power peak when not changing anything, i.e., at zero on the x-axis in the figure above. But gravitational wave detectors operate close to the dark fringe, that is where the power is zero. Change one parameter in the setup to make the setup initially yield zero output power.

Answer:

Since we have constructive interference when both the arm mirrors have zero tuning, we need to offset the tuning of one of the arm mirrors by 90 degrees ($\lambda/4$), which yields a roundtrip difference between the arms of $\lambda/2$, to get destructive interference. We can do this either by copy-pasting both the basekat and the kat1 code from above, and make the change directly in the FINESSE-code, or we can make use of PyKat.

Solution alternative (a): Using FINESSE-code.

The solution shown in the next cell is obtained by:

  • Copy-pasting the code of both basekat and kat1 from above.
  • Change the tuning of the mirror mY from 0 to 90 degrees.

An important note:

  • The star (*) after the put command is now important, because without it, the 90 degrees offset would be overwritten.
In [28]:
kat2a = finesse.kat()    # Initialising Finesse
kat2a.verbose = False    # Tells Finesse to talk less

# FINESSE code
code = """
## Parameters ##
const Pin 1M         # Laser power [W]
const LX 4000        # Length of X arm [m]
const LY 4000        # Length of Y arm [m]

## Laser & Beam splitter ##
l laser $Pin 0 n0                         # Laser
s s1 1 n0 nbsc                            # Space from laser to beam splitter
bs BS 0.5 0.5 0 45 nbsc nbsY nbsX nbsd    # Beam splitter (R=T=0.5, phi=0 deg, 
                                          # AoI=45 deg)

## X arm ##
s LX $LX nbsX nmX1         # Space, BS to mX (4000 m)
m mX 1 0 0 nmX1 nmX2       # Mirror mX (R=1, T=0, phi=0 deg)

## Y arm ##
s LY $LY nbsY nmY1         # Space, BS to mY (4000 m)
m mY 1 0 90 nmY1 nmY2      # Mirror mY (R=1, T=0, phi=0 deg)

## Output port ##
s sout 1 nbsd nout         # Space, BS to output (1 m)

## Detectors ##
pd pout nout               # Photo diode measuring DC-power


## Simulation instructions ##

# Varying the differential arm length
xaxis mX phi lin -90 90 200      # Sweeps phi of mX from -90 to 90 (200 steps) 
yaxis abs                        # Returns the magniutude of detector outputs
put* mY phi $mx1                 # Takes the negative (m in $mx1 is keyword for minus) 
                                 # value from the x-axis and adds it to phi of mY.
"""

# Parsing the FINESSE code
kat2a.parseCommands(code)
# Running the simulation
out2a = kat2a.run()

Solution alternative (b): Making use of PyKat.

  • deepcopy the kat1-object.
  • Use PyKat to change the value of the tuning of the mirror mY.
In [8]:
# Copying the kat1-object
kat2b = deepcopy(kat1)
# Setting the tuning of the mirror mY.
kat2b.mY.phi = 90
# Running the simulation.
out2b = kat2b.run() # run Finesse, the output will be stored in 'out'

Plotting both solution (a) and (b), which must be identical:

In [9]:
# Plotting solution alternative (a)
fig2a = out2a.plot(xlabel="DARM / 2 [deg]", 
                   ylabel="Power [W]", 
                   title="Solution (a), Output power vs. DARM")

# Plotting solution alternative (b)
fig2b = out2b.plot(xlabel="DARM / 2 [deg]", 
                   ylabel="Power [W]", 
                   title="Solution (b), Output power vs. DARM")

4.2. Detune the operating point

Your setup now yields 0 power if nothing is changed, however, the current gravitational wave detectors do not operate exactly at the dark fringe, but slightly off it. The reason for this lays outside the scope of this notebook: we need a local oscillator that beats with the signal sidebands, created in the the arms by gravitational waves, to see the the signal sidebands. Don't worry if you don't understand the former sentence.

Change the tuning slightly of one of the arm mirrors so that we get 10 mW as output. What length offset does this tuning offset corresponds to? Why not a larger number than 10 mW?

Comment: In case you want to use a `scipy.optimize` tool (I would suggest minimize_scalar()), FINESSE need can be told to compute results for one data point per run by using the command noxaxis in the FINESSE-code, or by making use of PyKat by typing kat.noxaxis=True..

Answer:

One way of solving this is to manually sweeping the differential arm length tuning just as before, and successively "zoom" in around the x-axis region that contains the output power of 10 mW. However, below we make use of the scipy.optimize function called minimize_scalar().

  • Setup the FINESSE model to initially operate at the dark fringe as in 3.1., and tell FINESSE to only output one value per run by using the noxaxis command, which is necessary when using minimize_scalar().
In [10]:
kat3 = deepcopy(basekat)
kat3.mY.phi = 90
code = '''
## Detectors ##
pd pout nout                     # Photo diode at the output port

## Simulation instructions ##
noxaxis                          # Telling FINESSE to simulate only the current setup
yaxis abs                        # Returns magnitude of detector outputs
'''
# Parsing the FINESSE code
kat3.parseCommands(code)

Test-running and printing power to check if it is zero (or extremely close to zero).

In [11]:
# Running once to test
out3_test = kat3.run()
# Printing
print('Pout =  {0} W'.format(out3_test['pout']))
Pout =  3.74939945665464e-27 W
  • Next step is to write a cost function that is minimised when this task is solved. As input we have the tuning of the mirror mX, and as output we have the magnitude of the difference between the output power and 10 mW for this input tuning.
In [29]:
# Copying kat3
kat3b = deepcopy(kat3)
# Cost function to minimise
def f(x):
    kat3b.mX.phi = x       # Setting new tuning of mirror mX
    out3b = kat3b.run()     # Running the simulation
    # Printing values to screen to monitor the process
    print('Tuning: {0} \t \t Power: {1}'.format(x, out3b['pout']))
    # Returning the absolute value of the deviation from 10 mW.
    return np.abs(out3b['pout'] - 0.01)
  • Using the scipy.optimise function minimize_scalar() to find the solution.
In [13]:
import scipy.optimize as op

# Minimising the function f using the method Bounded, 
# checking for solution between tunings of 0 and 1 degree,
# using maximally 100 iterations, using x-value tolerance of 10^(-8). 
sol = op.minimize_scalar(f, method = 'Bounded', bounds=(0,1), 
                         options={'maxiter': 100, 'xatol': 1e-05})

# Storing the obtained detuning
detuning = sol.x
# Printing important information
print()
print('Success: {0}. {1}'.format(sol.success, sol.message))
Tuning: 0.3819660112501051 	 	 Power: 44.4424242010141
Tuning: 0.6180339887498948 	 	 Power: 116.348988150856
Tuning: 0.2360679774997897 	 	 Power: 16.9756509272537
Tuning: 0.14589803375031546 	 	 Power: 6.48414434936049
Tuning: 0.09016994374947425 	 	 Power: 2.47672606192964
Tuning: 0.055728090000841224 	 	 Power: 0.946025657528926
Tuning: 0.03444185374863304 	 	 Power: 0.361349717370799
Tuning: 0.0212862362522082 	 	 Power: 0.138023320485246
Tuning: 0.013155617496424847 	 	 Power: 0.0527202186843213
Tuning: 0.008130618755783355 	 	 Power: 0.0201373318618009
Tuning: 0.0050249987406414945 	 	 Power: 0.00769177636038533
Tuning: 0.003991915858772995 	 	 Power: 0.00485419805457298
Tuning: 0.005587477045705848 	 	 Power: 0.00951012527353279
Tuning: 0.0065588707407479244 	 	 Power: 0.0131042713518028
Tuning: 0.005724747878595656 	 	 Power: 0.00998314693900542
Tuning: 0.006043354461144479 	 	 Power: 0.0111252779218936
Tuning: 0.005769537454130088 	 	 Power: 0.0101399713455592
Tuning: 0.005706749332410473 	 	 Power: 0.00992047180461852
Tuning: 0.005733293234624742 	 	 Power: 0.0100129729566307
Tuning: 0.005736626652996557 	 	 Power: 0.0100246197116765
Tuning: 0.005729959816252927 	 	 Power: 0.0100013329712062

Success: True. Solution found.
  • Testing the obtained solution. It should not matter which mirror we apply the extra detuning too, thus we test this by adding the obtained detuning to the mirror mY.
In [26]:
# Copying kat3
kat3c = deepcopy(kat3)
# Adding the detuning to the tuning of the mY mirror
kat3c.mY.phi = kat3c.mY.phi.value + detuning
# Running simulation
out3c = kat3c.run()
# Printing results
print('Pout = {} mW'.format(1000.0*out3c['pout']))
Pout = 10.0013329711608 mW

4.3. Macroscopical arm length difference

Investigate the response of the Michelson interferometer to a change in the macroscopic arm length difference, i.e., change the lengths of the space components. What do you see and why?

Answer:

Since the macroscopic arm length is defined as an integer multiple of the the wavelength, we don't expect to see any change in power when changing this parameter. But lets look at it. Below, this is done in the following steps:

  • Copy basekat using deepcopy
  • Add code for detectors and simulation instructions
    • Vary the length of the x-arm between 3000 m and 5000 m.
    • Use a function (keyword func) together with put to change the length of the other arm in the opposite direction.
In [15]:
kat4 = deepcopy(basekat)
code = '''
## Detectors ##
pd pout nout                     # Photo diode at the output port

## Simulation instructions ##
xaxis* LX L lin -1000 1000 200   # Sweeps L of LX from 3000m to 5000m. 
func ylen = 4000-$x1             # Function ranging betwen 1000 and -1000 
                                 # ($x1 goes from 3000 to 5000)
put* LY L $ylen                  # Adds the value in ylen to the length L of LY, 
                                 # i.e., length of LY goes form 5000 to 3000

yaxis abs                        # Returns the magnitud of detector outputs
noplot ylen                      # Not plotting ylen
'''

# Parsing the FINESSE fcode
kat4.parseCommands(code)
# Running the simulation
out4 = kat4.run()

Plotting the result:

In [16]:
fig4 = out4.plot(ylabel='Power [W]',
                 xlabel='DARM / 2 [m]',
                 title='Power vs. Macroscopical Differential Arm Length')

As we can see, the power remains constant as expected. The above seems to indicate that the macroscopic arm-length difference plays no role in the Michelson output signal. However, this is only correct for a monochromatic laser beam with infinite coherence length, and as long as we only consider one frequency component. In real interferometers, care must be taken that the arm-length difference is well below the coherence length of the light source.

In gravitational-wave detectors the macroscopic arm-length difference is an important design feature: it is kept very small in order to reduce coupling of laser noise into the output but needs to retain a finite size to allow the transfer of phase modulation sidebands from the input to the output port.

4.4. Macroscopic arm length difference and change in frequency

In FINESSE the frequency of a laser field can be specified in two different ways:

  • One can set the absolute frequency of the carrier laser field by specifying the carrier wavelength. This can be done either by changing the parameter lambda in the kat.ini file located in your FINESSE directory, or by using the finesse code line 'lambda 1550n', or in PyKat by using kat.lambda0 = 1550.0e-9. In the last 2 examples we used 1550 nm as the new wavelength.

  • One can specify a frequency offset relative to the carrier by setting the frequency offset parameter f of the laser component.

Your task it to change both the absolute frequency and the relative frequency, but in separate runs, and see how these parameters changes the result of task 3.3. What do you see, and why?

Hint: Remember that FINESSE defines macroscopic lengths as integer multiples of the carrier wavelength.

Answer:

When setting the absolute wavelength of the laser, all macroscopic length are defined as integer multiples of the new wavelength, hence, no phase changes and we expect the plot to remain the same as in task 3.3.

However, when changing the relative frequency $\Delta f$, the macroscopic lengths are no longer defined as multiple integers of the laser field in use. Thus, the field in an arm returning to the beam splitter is generally phase shifted relative to the field entering the arm at the beam splitter, even without non-zero tuning of the mirrors. The roundtrip phase change in an arm is given by

\begin{align} \varphi_{rt} = -2\left(\frac{2\pi \Delta f L}{c} + \phi \right), \end{align}

where $\phi$ is the tuning in radians, $c$ is the speed of light, and $L$ is the macroscopic length of the arm. From this expression, we can clearly see that the roundrip phase depends on the macroscopic length in FINESSE as long as the laser frequency offset $\Delta f$ is nonzero. And since we change the arm length difference, the roundtrip change in each arm must in general be different from each other, so we expect the output power to change with changing macroscopic arm length difference when we use a laser frequency offset.

Solution with changed absolute frequency. Changing from default of $\lambda_0 = 1064$ nm to $\lambda_0=1550$ nm.

  • Copying basekat
  • Copy/paste the FINESSE-code from task 3.3.
  • Setting new $\lambda_0$ to 1550 nm in the FINESSE code using the command lambda. You can also test doing this directly in your kat.ini file, and by using PyKat as kat5.lambda0 = 1.55e-6.
In [17]:
# Copying basekat
kat5 = deepcopy(basekat)
# FINESSE code
code = """
# Setting new reference wavelength
lambda 1550n

## Detectors ##
pd pout nout                     # Photo diode at the output port

## Simulation instructions ##
xaxis* LX L lin -1000 1000 200   # Sweeps L of LX from 3000m to 5000m 
func ylen = 4000-$x1             # Function ranging betwen 1000 and -1000 
                                 # ($x1 goes from 3000 to 5000)
put* LY L $ylen                  # Adds the value in ylen to L of LY, i.e., 
                                 # the length of LY goes from 5000 to 3000

yaxis abs                        # Returns the magnitude of detector outputs
noplot ylen                      # Not plotting ylen
"""

# Parsing the FINESSE code
kat5.parseCommands(code)
# Running the simulation
out5 = kat5.run()

Plotting results:

In [30]:
fig5 = out5.plot(ylabel='Power [W]', 
                 xlabel='DARM / 2 [m]', 
                 title='Power vs. Macroscopical Arm Length Difference, ' 
                       '$\lambda_0 = 1550$ nm')

The output power does not depend on the macroscopic arm length difference when the carrier frequency is changed.

Solution with changed offset frequency: Offsetting to 100 kHz.

  • Copy basekat
  • Copy/paste code from task 3.3.
  • Use PyKat to set the laser frequency offset to 100 kHz. You can also copy/paste the basekat-code and set the offset directly in the FINESSE-code as well.
In [32]:
# Copying basekat
kat6 = deepcopy(basekat)
# Setting offset frequency to 100 kHz.
kat6.laser.f = 1.0e5
code = """
## Detectors ##
pd pout nout                     # Photo diode at the output port

## Simulation instructions ##
xaxis* LX L lin -1000 1000 200   # Sweeps L of LX from 3000 m to 5000 m
func ylen = 4000-$x1             # Function ranging betwen 1000 and -1000 
                                 # ($x1 goes from 3000 to 5000)
put* LY L $ylen                  # Adds the value in ylen to L of LY, i.e., 
                                 # length of LY goes form 5000 to 3000
                                 
yaxis abs                        # Outputs the amplitude of measured quantities.
noplot ylen                      # Not plotting ylen
"""
# Parsing the FINESSE fcode
kat6.parseCommands(code)
# Running the simulation
out6 = kat6.run()

Plotting results:

In [34]:
fig6 = out6.plot(ylabel='Power [W]', 
                 xlabel='DARM / 2 [m]', 
                 title='Power vs. Macroscopical Arm Length Difference, ' 
                       '$\Delta f = 100$ kHz')

When offsetting the laser frequency, we create a dependency on the macroscopic arm length difference, just as we expected.

5. Summary

In this session we have:

  • built a FINESSE model of a Michelson interferometer
  • investigated how the power depends on the microscopical arm length difference
  • calibrated the operating point to the dark fringe
  • detuned the operating point to give a specific amount of output power.
  • investigated how the output power depends on the macroscopic arm length difference.
  • investigated how the output power depends on the macroscopic arm length difference when we change the reference carrier frequency, and offset the laser frequency.

In the next session we will look into how the Michelson depends on Mirror asymmetries.

 

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